News

Research collaborators at WVU and UNAM recently went into contract with the government of Vera Cruz, Mexico to provide 100 e-NABLE hands in exchange for survey results.

 

 

About

The E-Nable Followup group is responsible for leading a research effort to track the use of prosthetic devices by recipients and document their impact. Some of our goals include:

  • Understanding the experience of making and receiving E-Nable devices
  • Identify opportunities to improve that experience
  • Develop a pool of recipients and makers willing to answer questions about the experience & participate in studies
  • Develop a process for others to do research involving participants drawn from the E-Nable community
  • Connect researchers with others who are interested in similar things

For more information contact jschull @ e-NABLE.org, saiphcita @ gmail.com, or jmankoff @ acm.org

The E-Nable Followup group currently includes the following people:


Saiph Savage  Associate professor, West Virginia University. Research collaborator, UNAM.

Current study: Surveying makers and recipients in Mexico about e-NABLE devices.


Claudia Flores Saviaga,  PhD student, West Virginia University. Research collaborator, UNAM. Technology advisor for the Mexican government (Veracruz).

Current study: Surveying makers and recipients in Mexico about e-NABLE device


Caroline Anderson, High school researcher, West Virginia University.

Current study: Surveying makers and recipients in Mexico about e-NABLE devices.


Africa Rodriguez, Undergraduate student, UNAM. Research collaborator, West Virginia University.

Current study: Surveying makers and recipients in Mexico about e-NABLE devices


Chelsea Ngo, Pediatric Physical Therapist Licensed Applicant, Western University of Health Sciences.

Interests: Kids! and helping those with developmental delay and/or neuromuscular disorders, upper and lower extremity prosthetics, 3D-printed devices, evaluation of the impact of e-NABLE devices on functional tasks and daily activity

Current study: Determining the impact on functionality of e-NABLE devices on     daily activities for the children and if there is a need for professional intervention

Number of participants: 2 (anticipated)


Jon Schull, Founder of e-NABLE.

Interests: Social informatics, social engineering, e-NABLE, information visualization, python programming, device design.


Jen Mankoff, Ladner Professor, CSE, University of Washington.

Interests: Tools and Techniques for empowering individuals and increasing equity in health, accessibility, and sustainability. Publications studying making and/or use process issues

  • Understanding Volunteer AT Fabricators: Opportunities and Challenges in DIY-AT for Others in e-NABLE (ACM pagePDF link)
  • Clinical and Maker Perspectives on the Design of Assistive Technology with Rapid Prototyping Technologies. ASSETS 2016: 251-256
  • Helping Hands: Requirements for a Prototyping Methodology for Upper-limb Prosthetics Users. CHI 2016: 1769-1780
  • Understanding Uncertainty in Measurement and Accommodating its Impact in 3D Modeling and Printing. Conference on Designing Interactive Systems 2017: 1067-1078

Goeran Fiedler, Rehabilitation Technologist, University of Pittsburgh.

Interests: Upper limb prosthetic design & tracking.


Daniel Ashbrook, Assistant Professor in the Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences at the Rochester Institute of Technology.

Interests: Experiences, challenges, and successes around the process of designing e-NABLE hands and how the design process affects the use of the hands later on.

Publication: Understanding Volunteer AT Fabricators: Opportunities and Challenges in DIY-AT for Others in e-NABLE (ACM page, PDF link)


Eric BubarAssociate Professor of Physics, Marymount University.

Interests: Quantitative assessment of e-NABLE designs, creation of task-specific devices, creation of partial prosthetic designs, customized 3d printed assistive devices from organic modeling around 3d scans